Costed: Flooring

Words:
Jonathan White

Jonathan White, R&D executive at Gleeds, gives an overview of flooring costs

The choice of material for a floor covering should consider durability, sustainability, heat resistance, safety, hygiene and acoustic properties. Materials fit into five main categories.

Soft coverings: carpet, woven or felted from natural or man-made fibres. These are selected primarily for comfort and are the easiest covering to replace and upgrade. 

Wood flooring: Hardwoods are more durable than softwoods. Laminate has either a plywood or fibreboard core with a plastic surface styled to match timber. Wood floors are wear resistant, durable and can be refinished, but vulnerable to moisture, may dent easily, shrink and expand and can wear unevenly.

Hard flooring: concrete/cement, ceramic tile, glass tiles and natural stone – hard versatile and extremely durable, heat and stain resistant and easy to maintain. This is difficult to repair and tends to be more expensive.

Resilient flooring: formed from materials with some elasticity, including linoleum, vinyl, cork and rubber. One of the most affordable floor coverings, durable and easy to maintain. It must be installed over a smooth substrate, is difficult to repair and vulnerable to moisture in tile form.

Seamless chemical flooring: Applied in liquid form to provide a completely seamless covering for wet areas such as laboratories. Added granular or rubberised particles can improve grip. 

Latest

Tired of banging your head against the stainless-steel trim of your highly conspicuous cooker hood?

As 3D printing reaches traditionally cast sanitaryware Grohe’s Allure Brilliant and Atrio ranges seem to be pushing the envelope.

It takes calves of steel to traverse the 96-mile West Highland Way, Scotland’s first official long-distance path.

Titles to enjoy on the lounger this summer cover women architects in China, neighbourhood planning, and rescue and reuse

Three titles to enjoy on the lounger

RIBA International Prize nominee Philippe Prost's restoration of a mining village in northern France is helping transform the area’s reputation too, as vegetation reclaims the once menacing slag heaps

Old mining village becomes open air museum