img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Costed: Flooring

Words:
Jonathan White

Jonathan White, R&D executive at Gleeds, gives an overview of flooring costs

The choice of material for a floor covering should consider durability, sustainability, heat resistance, safety, hygiene and acoustic properties. Materials fit into five main categories.

Soft coverings: carpet, woven or felted from natural or man-made fibres. These are selected primarily for comfort and are the easiest covering to replace and upgrade. 

Wood flooring: Hardwoods are more durable than softwoods. Laminate has either a plywood or fibreboard core with a plastic surface styled to match timber. Wood floors are wear resistant, durable and can be refinished, but vulnerable to moisture, may dent easily, shrink and expand and can wear unevenly.

Hard flooring: concrete/cement, ceramic tile, glass tiles and natural stone – hard versatile and extremely durable, heat and stain resistant and easy to maintain. This is difficult to repair and tends to be more expensive.

Resilient flooring: formed from materials with some elasticity, including linoleum, vinyl, cork and rubber. One of the most affordable floor coverings, durable and easy to maintain. It must be installed over a smooth substrate, is difficult to repair and vulnerable to moisture in tile form.

Seamless chemical flooring: Applied in liquid form to provide a completely seamless covering for wet areas such as laboratories. Added granular or rubberised particles can improve grip. 

Latest

High Performance timber windows by manufacturer Hugo Carter are helping to reduce the transmission of traffic noise at the Radisson Blu Edwardian Grafton Hotel

For hoteliers who sell sleep, silence is golden

As the government announces a capital boost for schools, practice alma-nac has used the pandemic to deepen its relationship with schools by producing a new guide

Guidance offers post-Covid promise too

New Zealand turns Māori tradition inside out with Toto Whare, an internalised home made affordable by ‘rigorous shopping’

A recently returned ex-pat, I found myself at the New Zealand Institute of Architects’ Awards in the somewhat paradoxical position of acting as an international juror while being ‘indigenous’.

The Portuguese practice combines colourful distinctive projects with an efficient but frenzied workflow and a constantly evolving set of tropes

The Porto practice combines colourful distinctive projects with a frenzied workflow

Could Hollywood glitter give Cardross seminary a happy ever after? Biden restores design sense by reversing Trump’s classical architecture decree, just as Boris backs the idea of a roundabout deep in the Irish Sea. And Baca thinks mini Dubai with a lily-shaped island of 40 homes near King’s Lynn

Happy ending for Cardross? Plus Boris’ subsea roundabout