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Schueco's new panoramic sliding doors feature slim sight lines, maximum transparency and a choice of frame configurations

In association with
Schueco's ASE 67 PD door is available in two options with different outer frames.
Schueco's ASE 67 PD door is available in two options with different outer frames.

When Schueco UK launched its ASS 77 PD ‘panoramic’ sliding doors in early 2012, the move was widely welcomed by architects looking for a door with maximum transparency that could span wide openings and still operate effortlessly.

Schueco's new ASE 67 PD door is set to prove equally impressive. It provides the same minimal sight lines with an outer frame that remains concealed in the building structure, resulting in a huge ‘panoramic’ area of clear glass.

The door can be configured in a variety of opening combinations of two, three or four leaves, each up to 3.2m wide and 3.5m high. The moving vent can be double- or triple-glazed depending on the particular specification and the level of insulation required.

Using a simplified method of construction so it's easier to manufacture, the Schueco ASE 67 PD door is available in two options with different outer frames.

  • Schueco's ASE 67 PD door features two locking options.
    Schueco's ASE 67 PD door features two locking options.
  • Schueco offers a variety of opening combinations with two, three or four leaves.
    Schueco offers a variety of opening combinations with two, three or four leaves.
  • Concealing the frames in a building's structure produces a panoramic area of clear glass.
    Concealing the frames in a building's structure produces a panoramic area of clear glass.
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The slimmer option has a 57mm frame and is suitable for renovation projects; it offers a lower overall frame cost without impacting on sound insulation (up to 46 dB). The flat threshold is designed to eliminate the possibility of accidents, while still allowing the door to deliver watertightness to 300 Pa and wind resistance to Class C3.

The deeper 90mm option delivers watertightness to 600 Pa while maintaining the aesthetics and sound insulation of the 57mm system.

  • A 31mm central mullion can accommodate glass widths of 36mm to 49.6mm.
    A 31mm central mullion can accommodate glass widths of 36mm to 49.6mm.
  • The flush threshold is designed to eliminate accidents.
    The flush threshold is designed to eliminate accidents.
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Both versions offer a very slim central mullion width of 31mm and can accommodate glass widths ranging from 36mm to 49.6mm. A choice of two locking options, one in the centre and one on the side, provides architects with design flexibility and security.

For more information and technical support, visit: www.schueco.co.uk

 

Contact:

01908 282111

mkinfobox@schueco.com


 

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