Shaftesbury Theatre, West End

A powerful, sculpted addition to the West End skyline

Shaftesbury Theatre, West End.
Shaftesbury Theatre, West End. Credit: Peter Cook

Bennetts Associates for The Theatre of Comedy Company
Contract value: £5m
GIA: 342m²
Cost per m²: £14,620 

To remain competitive this grade II listed Edwardian theatre needed to extend its performance capabilities. This retrofit project has added a new fly tower, which increases flying capacity from 12 to 35 tons, and houses offices and plant rooms.

  • Shaftesbury Theatre, West End
    Shaftesbury Theatre, West End Credit: Peter Cook
  • Shaftesbury Theatre, West End.
    Shaftesbury Theatre, West End. Credit: Peter Cook
  • Shaftesbury Theatre, West End.
    Shaftesbury Theatre, West End. Credit: Peter Cook
  • Shaftesbury Theatre, West End.
    Shaftesbury Theatre, West End. Credit: Peter Cook
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A new structure was interlaced within the existing building structure to carry the exceptional new load. Piles were driven 28m down while the 1,400-seat theatre remained fully operational. The fly tower is encircled by rudimentary staff offices in a stepped profile, to avoid overheating and to break down the bulk. The works have reduced the theatre’s operational costs through improvements in plant efficiency and the introduction of air source heat pumps. The success of this complicated project is a reflection of the excellent relationship between client and architect, who are continuing their creative partnership on the next phase of improvements. The result of these efforts is the creation of a terrific new facility and powerful, sculpted Corten addition to the skyline of London’s West End.

See more winners in the RIBA Regional Awards – London: Arts


 

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