Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building, Cambridge

Transformed learning opportunities

Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building
Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building Credit: Richard Chivers

Chadwick Dryer Clarke Studio and LSI Architects for The Stephen Perse Foundation
Contract value: Confidential
GIA: 2,940m²

The technical challenges this project had to overcome were severe. The site has very restricted access, the school remained operational throughout the construction, the planning authority was not convinced that the proposed volume could be accommodated within the conservation area and neighbours were worried about noise and overlooking. But Chadwick Dryer Clarke has transformed learning opportunities at the school as well as solving a host of problems with the existing buildings by bringing a disparate collection into coherent use.

  • Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building
    Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building Credit: Richard Chivers
  • Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building
    Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building Credit: Richard Chivers
  • Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building
    Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building Credit: Richard Chivers
  • Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building
    Stephen Perse Foundation New Sports and Learning Building Credit: Richard Chivers
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The new sports hall is at the centre of the plan with new corridors, rooftop play spaces, study areas and classrooms wrapped and stacked around it, using every inch of the site. The circulation has been ingeniously designed to offer views of different learning activities, link the old building to a new lift, and open up the interior spaces to the outside.

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