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Brunel Building, Paddington

Site constraints prompt external superstructure which allows clear spans and provides solar shading

Brunel Building.
Brunel Building. Credit: Fletcher Priest

Fletcher Priest Architects for Derwent London
Contract value: undisclosed 
GIA: 22,600m2

Replacing a three-storey, 1970s office that spanned the canal and filled the whole site with a ground floor car park, the Brunel Building is designed to attract occupiers and reflect the significance of its prominent location. The structure deals with several constraints including two Bakerloo underground tunnels. The response is an external superstructure allowing clear spans and providing solar shading. High floor-to-floor dimensions give deep daylight penetration and two 160m deep artesian wells radically reduce energy consumption. The adjacent canal is publicly accessible for the first time: huge sliding glazed walls open the reception and café restaurant to a broad new towpath public realm. Occupiers enjoy two large roof terraces.

  • Brunel Building.
    Brunel Building. Credit: Fletcher Priest
  • Brunel Building.
    Brunel Building. Credit: Fletcher Priest
  • Brunel Building.
    Brunel Building. Credit: Fletcher Priest
  • What was there before.
    What was there before.
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