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Winner House No7, Tiree

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This is a special house in a special place, referencing not only traditional Scottish ‘black houses’ but also the more recent Nissen huts of World War Two. A ruined, grade B listed black house forms the basis of the project which comprises a ‘living’ house and a guest house, linked by a utility wing. The effect is of a traditional cottage surrounded by agricultural buildings, with the metal-clad tunnel shaped roofs echoing the Nissen huts which found new uses by farmers.

Traditional timber frame techniques were used to build the guesthouse, while the roofs of the utility block and the living house have CNC-cut spruce glulam frames. The forms were determined in part by the need to ship the elements to Tiree on a Cal-Mac ferry. Roof portions were split along the apex for ease of transport and connection on site. This allowed the contractors to erect the frame quickly and safely in the inclement weather. 

Internally, the building uses pine in a number of different ways, referencing the pine tongue-and-groove boards that are prevalent throughout the highlands and islands but with an imaginative feel. So there is a pitch-pine worktop, and pine skirting boards are used to clad the ceilings of two of the main spaces and the sculptural stairs to the hall. These stairs were laid like Jenga blocks on site after being milled to size from reclaimed Victorian pitch pine beams. 

The result is an assembly of buildings which sit comfortably in their environment and make the most of the views. Despite traditional references, the buildings are clearly creations of today. The judges said: ‘This pair of houses seems to work on every level. There is a surprising amount of accommodation. It has all been put together beautifully by local craftsmen living on the island.’


Client: Private

Architect: Denizen Works

Main contractor/builder: John MacKinnon Builders

Structural engineer: CRA

Wood supplier: James Donaldson & Sons

Timber: Scottish spruce glulam, Scottish larch and reclaimed pitch pine

  • The living house has a tunnel-shaped ceiling.
    The living house has a tunnel-shaped ceiling.

 


Highly Commended

WoodBlock House, London

 
  • Unpainted larch clads the studio, topped by the living section wrapped in horizontal painted plywood.
    Unpainted larch clads the studio, topped by the living section wrapped in horizontal painted plywood.
  • Internal living space is exposed CLT.
    Internal living space is exposed CLT.

The brief was to create a studio, home and office for UK artist Richards Woods and his family, the result – constructed in cross-laminated timber – was a simple, large workshop and printing studio space on the ground floor, with separate living accommodation above, all characterised by the qualities of timber, good spaces and daylight. The home section of the building is south-facing and sits on top of the north-facing studio. The former is horizontally clad in painted plywood using a printing technique for which the artist-client is internationally renowned; by contrast the studio is clad in unpainted larch. The judges said: ‘This is an original looking house that fits the client’s needs. We particularly liked the light-filled study on the top floor.’


Client: Richard Woods Studio

Architect: dRMM

Main contractor/builder: Cape Construction

M & E consultant: Michael Popper Associates

CDM consultant: North Laine Design

Structural engineer: Timber First

Wood supplier: Merk Timber

Timber: British larch and CLT


 

 


Shortlist

  • Limpley Stoke  Eco-house. Bath Hewitt Architects.
    Limpley Stoke Eco-house. Bath Hewitt Architects.
  • Bourne Lane, Tonbridge, Kent. Nash Architects.
    Bourne Lane, Tonbridge, Kent. Nash Architects.