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How the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 operates

The RIBA Plan of Work 2013 has eight stages, numbered 0-7, and eight ‘task bars’ that replace the key tasks in the RIBA Plan of Work 2007, three of which (procurement, programme and planning) the user can customise.

Stages

The eight stages of the 2013 Plan are:

> Stage 0 Strategic Definition: A new stage in which a project is strategically appraised and defined before a detailed brief is created. 

> Stage 1 Preparation and Brief: Focuses on the creation of the initial project brief and associated feasibility studies, and emphasises the need to properly assemble the project team.

> Stage 2 Concept Design: Maps exactly to the former Stage C (Concept)

> Stage 3 Developed Design: Maps broadly to former Stage D (Design Development) and part of Stage E (Technical Design). The strategic difference is that now the Developed Design will be co-ordinated and aligned with Cost Information by the end of Stage 3.  Extra time will be needed for the lead designer to review information and to make any changes arising from comments.

> Stage 4 Technical Design: Comprises the residual technical work of core design team members and specialist subcontractors with design duties.  

> Stage 5 Construction: broadly maps to former Stage K (Construction to Practical Completion), and includes Stage J (Mobilisation).

> Stage 6 Handover and Close Out: Deals with activities associated with issue of the Practical Completion Certificate through to the Final Certificate, plus new activities associated with building handover.

> Stage 7 In Use: A new stage that covers the building in use, performance monitoring, updating of project information, and long term project feedback activities until the end of the building’s life or the commissioning of a new Stage 0.

Task Bars

Replacing stages, the flexible task bars can be adjusted to match the procurement approach and  planning activities, allowing users to generate a bespoke practice or project Plan. The remaining task bars provide details of key support tasks, sustainability check points, project team information exchanges and new government information gateways.

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For further preview information about the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 and to book free regional roadshows go to www.architecture.com/planofwork.

The Plan of Work  2013 will be launched on 21 May 2013 – as a downloadable file and an online version (that enables a bespoke project or practice Plan to be created), plus associated technical guidance from RIBA Publishing.  All will be on www.ribaplanofwork.com.

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