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Contributions to design team activities

An introduction to and a study guide for collaboration for contractor contributions to design team activities
Tom Taylor, 
Dashdot Enterprises/Buro Four 128pp PB £12.50


‘Book learning is an interesting modern method of learning which is particularly flexible to suit the needs and circumstances of the individual’. No, it’s not Johannes Gutenberg in 1450 but the opening line of this book on collaboration.  As co-founder of project management firm Buro 4 and a visiting professor at Salford University, the author should know a lot about this. His book of ‘exercises’ explores the role of contractors at pre-construction design stage, and how the design team can best use their expertise. But you wonder how accessible the material is to those it’s targeting. It’s hardly a catchy title and the 18 self study modules are dry and impenetrable with few diagrams, and lack of real examples to place the knowledge in the real world. Back to the drawing board. 

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