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European Building Construction Illustrated

European Building Construction Illustrated
Francis DK Ching and Mark Mulville
Wiley, 472p, £34.99


Francis DK Ching and his simple line drawings have guided many students through a plethora of architectural elements in his Visual Dictionary of Architecture. In more recent years he applied that clarity to building construction. Here, in a welcome move, he collaborates with architectural technologist, Mark Mulville from the University of Greenwich, to tailor it to Europe. This is a comprehensive primer. So on the page devoted to green roofing, a drawing shows the build up of a roof, major types of system by vegetation are discussed and their value as an urban heat sink mentioned. The book attempts to lay out simply standards such as BREEAM as well as the Building Regulations, which will date it most quickly. It clarifies the language of construction; and is a first port of call when you are considering new details.   - Eleanor Young

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