img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

High impact fee negotiation and management

High impact fee negotiation and management for professionals
Ori Wiener, Kogan Page, 243pp, PB, £39.99


An architect told me that he has a small circle of architect friends who meet over dinner solely to discuss project fee negotiation, to ascertain that he is charging the market rate. Such financial intimacy is rare but  precious; and  for those of you not privy to it the old RIBA fee scales must offer very cold comfort. Wiener’s book is more reassuring. Writing in an accessible manner, he recognises the difficulty of fee  negotiation,  but sets it against the perils of discounting for any professional discipline. The mathematics? On page 27 a graph shows how a 10% discount leads to a 30% profit loss. His answers aren’t easy; negotiators must be pragmatic and robust,  and you need to be sure you know your worth. But it’s a stimulating, pithy read. ‘If you think hiring a professional is expensive,’ he quotes Red Adair, ‘Wait until you hire an amateur.’ 

Latest

How can we reduce the number of disputes that plague construction? Assessing where problems may lie is key to taking essential preventative action

Identify, collaborate, mitigate. Network Rail’s DAPs show the way

The Access Flooring Association classification system guarantees the longevity of flooring designed for high-performance commercial buildings and data centres

Access Flooring Association classification guarantees longevity for raised access floors

Christopher Nicholson’s modernist hanger and clubhouse for the London Gliding Club incorporates a 27m long curved window for maximum views from the lounge

Christopher Nicholson’s London Gliding Club at Dunstable

Too often, racial diversity in architecture favours people who match the profile of those already in elite positions rather than representing the majority of underprivileged racial groups, argues Indujah Srikaran

Racial diversity in architecture comprises people in elite positions rather than representing underprivileged racial groups

Construction’s procurement traditions limit the value it gains from BIM and other digital technologies, but more remote working offers a chance to change that

The industry has the chance to get up to speed with BIM