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Intelligent Buildings: Design, management and operation

Intelligent Buildings: Design, management and operation, 2nd ed.
Derek Clements-Croome ed.
ICE Publishing, 344p, £45


Editor Clements-Croome, emeritus professor in architectural engineering at Reading University, is the academic daddy of intelligent buildings and is a prolific writer and lecturer on the subject. This second edition of his 2004 book pulls in the trending themes of value analysis, whole-life costing, BIM and post-occupancy evaluation. The book is split into key subjects: people-centred sustainable design; intelligent, smart and digital approaches; management and operation processes; and futures. If you’re expecting a Reyner Banham-like  philosophical overview of the subject, think again – there is a highly analytical, scientific rigour at work here, which gives the book a density that may not appeal to all. But the sense is of a book documenting the state of intelligent building technology as it exists today. - Jan-Carlos Kucharek

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