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Ambitious, creative and committed with an astute critical eye

Associate, Ayre Chamberlain Gaunt
Part 1: 2008 Part 2: 2010


It is difficult to find a more glowing reference for a Rising Star than Matthew Chamberlain’s for Emily Pallot. It reads: ‘It was obvious to us when we first interviewed Emily what a talented and enthusiastic individual she was. She has come to embody everything we look for: ambitious, creative and committed. She has an astute critical eye to project and practice matters, while also being great with people.’ This year’s judges agreed that her CV and solid trajectory since working at Ayre Chamberlain Gaunt matches the recommendation.

Pallot joined the practice in 2011 after completing parts 1 and 2 at the University of Cardiff in 2010 and spending her year out working in Milwaukee in the USA at Korb and Associates Architects. After a string of internal promotions, last year Pallot was asked to lead Ayre Chamberlain Gaunt’s new London studio. She now heads a 12-strong team delivering large-scale mixed-use schemes in London and the South East, with a particular focus on regeneration. Current projects include Plevna Crescent, a 72-unit residential scheme in Haringey notable for its challenging planning issues because it is within a Site of Nature Conservation Interest. The design embraces the existing landscape and responds to neighbouring residential areas to create a sense of place and community, while respecting the unique ecology of the site.

Plevna Crescent, Haringey.
Plevna Crescent, Haringey.

I would like to see stronger connections between industry and education to better prepare graduates for practice

In addition to project work, Pallot heads a diverse range of research projects within the studio – recent topics include micro living and modern methods of construction (MMC). Outside the office, she has run and taught the Industry and Practice module at the University of Reading’s new School of Architecture since it opened in 2016. She is collaborating with the university to determine the content for all three years of the undergraduate course in this area.

What would you most like to improve about the industry?

I would like to see stronger connections between industry and education to better prepare graduates for practice. This gap can start to be bridged through industry-education teaching partnerships, as well as refining course structures with increased industry focus, more access to internships and networking and mentorship opportunities. This will ensure graduates are adaptable and can work across new project models.

See more members of the 2018 Rising Stars winning cohort here


RIBAJ Rising Stars is produced in association with Origin Doors & Windows

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