img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Marshall Inglis and Marcus Rothnie

Chlorophyllous Urbanism: Mumbai
Edinburgh School of Architecture & Landscape Architecture

Tutor: Dorian Wiszniewski


 

Chlorophyllous Urbanism takes inspiration from the territorialisation of the mangrove forests in Mumbai. Model
Chlorophyllous Urbanism takes inspiration from the territorialisation of the mangrove forests in Mumbai. Model

In Chlorophyllous Urbanism, Marshall Inglis and Marcus Rothnie create a new strategy for architectural intervention in the Indian city of Mumbai. This is based on a response to the contrasting approaches to territorialisation of two key factors in the city’s character: the economies of its fecund mangrove forest (identified as red), which was partly destroyed for land reclamation, and that of the colonial cotton industry (shown as green). The colonial economy encompassed mill lands, and cotton industry-driven intensities and railways.

  • Drawing of the Agronomy Centre
    Drawing of the Agronomy Centre
  • Mumbai Model.
    Mumbai Model.
12

The project aims to increase the propagation of the ‘red’ approach to urbanism that it understands as being more appropriate to how Mumbai naturally territorialises. It does this through the investigation of six sites along Mumbai’s Thane Creek coastline. Here, it creates persuasive architectural interventions (identified as gold) that dismantle the colonial green approach and instead increase ecological, social or political reds. These include a Mangrove Embassy, Vocational School and two Agronomy centres. Together these interventions become the Chlorophyllous Urbanism strategic plan for an imagined city of Mumbai based on the theories and territorial aspirations of the red approach of the mangroves.


Return to the main President's Medals page

Latest

PiP webinar: Architecture for Schools and Education Buildings

Are you a brilliant early-career design professional? We want to recognise your potential

Rising Stars is an opportunity for talented early-career professionals to be recognised

The 1957 modernist Dover Stage Hotel was designed by Hungarian-born Louis Erdi, one of the many refugees from Nazi-occupied Europe being celebrated at an RIBA conference

Dover Stage Hotel, 1957, Louis Erdi

Use of local craftspeople and sustainable innovations helped Jonathan Hendry Architects win planning consent for this 2024 RIBA East Midlands Award-winning house in open country

Local craftspeople help Jonathan Hendry Architects raise rural standards

Studio Partington used Dutch standard Energiesprong to retrofit 63 houses in Sneinton, in a scalable response to the climate crisis that has won it 2024 RIBA East Midlands Sustainability Award

63 retrofitted homes in Sneinton snap up 2024 RIBA East Midlands Sustainability Award