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The Passivhaus Handbook

The Passivhaus Handbook
Janet Cotterell and Adam Dadeby
Green Books £35


The back cover states that the authors, an architect and a Passivhaus consultant, each with over 20 years’ experience, are directors of Passivhaus Homes Ltd. This statement of vested interest also suggests the expertise that both of them can bring to their subject. As a result, this is an in-depth study of the Passivhaus methodology, whose principles still polarise UK architects. Split into two parts, the first section covers ‘The How and Why of Passivhaus’ while the second is a practical guide  to their construction analysing key issues such as thermal bridges, airtightness, moisture, windows and ventilation. Information is broken into digestible nuggets of information with box-outs, photographs and diagrams, illustrating both the benefits and potential pitfalls of the technique. The appendix carries a brief illustrated guide to certified UK Passivhaus projects, giving opportunities for architects to experience the technology for themselves. A valuable starter for architects wishing to pursue their own investigations. 

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