The Passivhaus Handbook

The Passivhaus Handbook
Janet Cotterell and Adam Dadeby
Green Books £35


The back cover states that the authors, an architect and a Passivhaus consultant, each with over 20 years’ experience, are directors of Passivhaus Homes Ltd. This statement of vested interest also suggests the expertise that both of them can bring to their subject. As a result, this is an in-depth study of the Passivhaus methodology, whose principles still polarise UK architects. Split into two parts, the first section covers ‘The How and Why of Passivhaus’ while the second is a practical guide  to their construction analysing key issues such as thermal bridges, airtightness, moisture, windows and ventilation. Information is broken into digestible nuggets of information with box-outs, photographs and diagrams, illustrating both the benefits and potential pitfalls of the technique. The appendix carries a brief illustrated guide to certified UK Passivhaus projects, giving opportunities for architects to experience the technology for themselves. A valuable starter for architects wishing to pursue their own investigations. 

Latest

This seminar aims to inform specifiers on the key information required for specifying sanitaryware

This seminar aims to inform specifiers on the key information required for specifying sanitaryware

Four key questions can reveal why your sustainably-designed housing isn’t performing as expected. Fionn Stevenson runs through six action points for a light touch POE

Light touch POE makes remedies and future improvements easy

From vegan wool to multi-functional public loos, Central St Martins graduate exhibition is a positive response to climate change issues

Central St Martins’ Designing in Turbulent Times

Lots of lovely ways to make seeing and walking in and out a pleasure

Smooth openings for your specifying needs

Hand Held to Super Scale: Building with Ceramics looks at a flourishing architectural medium and investigates whether the renewed popularity of brick has helped

Exhibition reveals ceramics’ growing role in architecture