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A breath of fresh air

GEZE UK unveils the OL Line natural ventilation system for high level windows and roof lights.

In association with

Opening and closing high level windows and roof lights is a breeze thanks to the launch of a new natural ventilation system from GEZE UK.

The OL Line manual window control system has been designed specifically for commercial and public buildings, including schools, and thanks to its modular design, can easily be retrofitted.

The OL Line provides an easy, reliable control system for even the most hard to reach windows. A manual opener is fitted to the opening vent which is linked via lengths of conduit and cable to a wall mounted operator. The conduit can easily be bent around obstructions allowing the handle to be placed within easy reach.

This modular system has been designed to be as flexible as possible. Multiple vents can be operated easily from a single operator in a choice of installation arrangements. Available in a choice of opening widths from the most popular Midi operator to the Maxi operator for heavier window loads, it is suitable for use on most styles of window, including roof lights when used with a screwjack opener.

Andy Howland, GEZE UK sales director said:  “The new OL Line is a natural extension to our range of natural ventilation products. It’s extremely flexible, easy to install and can be retrofitted. Therefore, the OL Line is the ideal manual system for public and commercial buildings as well as for schools where a cost effective ‘child-safe’ system is required.

“Ultimately, the new OL Line system makes natural ventilation a breath of fresh air!”

For more information visit www.geze.co.uk

 
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