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Aghast, Agape, Agate

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek

Tired of travertine? Ambivalent about alabaster? Maudlin about marble? Maybe it’s time to take the plunge and plumb for blue Agate. Ranging from sky-blue to cobalt, its astrological claims make it no surprise to find the translucent, iridescent stone on the walls of this spa. Apparently it increases energy levels, helps put men in touch with their emotions, heals your throat chakra and reduces stress, to name but a few of its ultramarine benefits. Italian stone firm Antolini now supplies it as part of the Precioustone collection, which includes quartz, Jasper, Mother of Pearl and even Swarowski panels. Can’t see the Blue Agate doing much for your pranayamic breathing techniques though – prices are confidential but could possibly lead to a sharp intake of breath.


 

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