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Words:
Simon Astridge

Simon Astridge, director of Simon Astridge Architecture Workshop, gives us three of his specification favourites

Birch plywood
We are always for looking for materials [especially for walls] that avoid the time consuming processes of plasterboarding, skimming and decorating. The clients of a residential private house wanted a contemporary material, but also one that was warm, and had an atmosphere. We chose birch faced high grade plywood for all walls, floor and ceilings – for its availability, price and relatively simple installation. The boards were nailed to a structure and the holes filled with plywood dust; then sanded and sealed in a matt clear varnish lacquer.
simonastridge.com/Plywood-House


 

Graphite panels
The wide range of Bulthaup finishes from Kitchen Architecture gives flexibility and opportunity to experiment and tailor products to individual projects. Our project for a subterranean wine tasting outlet in Putney, London, was based on the atmospherically-lit wine cave. Kitchen Architecture’s laser welded laminate graphite panel finish was the perfect fit. Panels were used for floating shelving, worktops, kitchen door fronts and back panels; the smooth joints of the graphite allowing for displays with maximum output.
simonastridge.com/Wine-Tasting


 

Portland limestone
Traditionally used throughout London for buildings such as St Paul’s Cathedral, we have used Portland limestone on projects for wet shower areas, bespoke stone basins and cistern tops. The material has a softness and beautiful depth that cannot be found with some porcelain tiles on the market. Most wet areas for the Plywood House were supplied by Wrights of Campden, which quarries and supplies the material. It needs to be sealed correctly before use and over time leaves a beautiful patina of water marks.
simonastridge.com/Plywood-House


 

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