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Designing ideal ceilings for schools

Armstrong Ceilings' metal and mineral fibre systems have been designed into a new teaching block at Ystalyfera School, near Swansea, for acoustic performance and visual appearance

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Armstrong Ceilings have been specified in the atrium at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School, near Swansea
Armstrong Ceilings have been specified in the atrium at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School, near Swansea

Two thousand square metres of Armstrong ceiling systems have been specified at the new £12.5 million secondary teaching block at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School in the Upper Swansea Valley, south Wales.

Specified by Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council, the products used in the new classrooms, break-out and circulation spaces include Armstrong's  D-H 700 micro-perforated metal Hook-On canopies, Axiom Knife Edge canopies with Ultima+ tiles and MicroLook 8 wood-effect metal tiles. 

Used throughout the high-tech 6,500m2 building, the D-H 700 metal Hook-On canopies with acoustic fleece were installed in classrooms while the Axiom Knife Edge with Ultima+ Vector tiles were used in other areas. Perla 600mm x 600mm mineral fibre tiles were also fitted in classrooms and toilet areas. In addition, the 1200mm x 300mm MicroLook 8 Lay-In tiles finished in an oak effect ,and featuring a 100mm Axiom Classic profile, were used in circulation and break-out areas, as well as in the spacious three-storey atrium.

The new three-storey steel-frame building replaces a 1970s three-storey CLASP-type teaching block to bring accommodation into the 21st century and was designed to BREEAM 'Excellent' and BIM Level 2 standards.

A spokesman for Neath Port Talbot Council said: 'Armstrong products are aesthetically pleasing. The ceiling rafts in the classrooms complied with sound and visual requirements, but also allowed us to use the exposed structural slab as thermal mass.'

  • Armstrong Ceilings at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School, near Swansea
    Armstrong Ceilings at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School, near Swansea
  • Armstrong Ceilings in the atrium at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School, near Swansea
    Armstrong Ceilings in the atrium at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School, near Swansea
  • Armstrong Ceilings in the classroom at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School, near Swansea
    Armstrong Ceilings in the classroom at Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera Welsh Medium Comprehensive School, near Swansea
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For more information and technical support visit www.armstrongceilings.co.uk

 

Contact

0800 371849

Sales-support@armstrong.com


 

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