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Box Rooflights for Outdoor Space

Vintry Court utilises a box rooflight for access to a roof top terrace

In association with

A popular solution to making the most of space and light is to transform flat roofspace into an external amenity area.

Glazing Vision were delighted to supply their standard three wall mounted box rooflight for this project, measuring over 4 metres wide and almost 2.5 metres in span. Supplied in two sections, the box rooflight creates an approximate 50% clear opening, with one pane of glass sliding over one fixed.

Glass areas are maximised with comparatively little visible supporting framework, resulting in a clean, contemporary external aesthetic.

In order to ensure further peace of mind and security, Glazing Vision installed dual proximity sensors to cover both horizontal and vertical edges. This means that if the beam is broken, the rooflight automatically stops. Glazing Vision also provided their standard current override safety system, which senses additional draw on the motors and will stop the rooflight closing if an obstruction is detected.

The implementation of a box rooflight helped to make the most of limited space, as well as to enhance the sense of community in Bermondsey’s London Bridge Quarter building.

To find out more about specifying glass rooflights for your project, please call our technical department on 01379 353 741, or request a CPD

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