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Bridge of size?

Moxon Architects has created a wonderful bit of infrastructure at the Argent King’s Cross development with this bridge across Regent’s Canal to the Camley Street park, east of Sir John Soane’s final resting place at St Pancras cemetery. Spanning 38m, the trough of the bridge and the U shaped fins that give it its strength are all formed out of 15mm painted steel plate which, modelled by Arup, has generated an extremely elegant example of ‘lean’ design. ‘The span to depth ratio is usually 1:20 or 1:25, but here we managed to make it 1:35,’ says Moxon director Ben Addy. ‘The bending moment of the bridge has been literally translated into the structural form.’ It’s so fine, in fact, that the central, boxed out portion of the bridge contains additional steel to dampen the live deflections created by its users, counterpointing massiveness with delicacy. Soane can rest easy…

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