img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Business school converts to Stirling

The redevelopment of Durham University’s £16.5m business school

There’s something of James Stirling’s Neue Staatsgallerie entrance to the redevelopment of Durham University’s £16.5m business school, designed by GSS Architecture. The building is topped off with an ‘iconic’, fully glazed, naturally ventilated extension, which the architect claims has turned a transient corridor into the effective social heart of the new facility. With the curved form meaning every pane of glass was unique, the Glulam timber structure was modelled in 3D for fabrication. Counter pointing this, two other new wings were added which echo the University’s more traditional collegiate quadrangle form. The business school, one of only a handful in the UK with triple accreditation, has clearly made the leap to Big Jim via the Big Bang.

 

Latest

Andrew Riddell, studying queerspace at the Bartlett, challenges the home as site ‘where heteronormativity is most firmly rooted’ in digital drawings to take 3rd winner, student

Student, 3rd Winner: Andrew Riddell

Dominic Murray-Vaughan intrigued with watercolour qualities in his ‘eerily empty’ images that blur painting, drawing and photography to achieve 3rd winner, practitioner

Practitioner, 3rd winner: Dominic Murray- Vaughan

Industry calls on government to mandate assessment and reporting of whole life carbon on building projects over 1000m2 through Building Regulations by 2027

Industry presses for whole life carbon limits in new buildings over 1000m2

Bathroom manufacturer says UK needs recognised standards for acoustic performance inside properties

Specify quiet bathroom products in lieu of regulation, says firm

This visitor building for a Scottish sawmill complex is testament to the architect's strong roots in craftsmanship, writes David Reat

This visitor building for a Scottish sawmill complex is testament to the architect's strong roots in craftsmanship