img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Chip off the old block

It’s like the adolescent kid of the mild-mannered parents. Literally in this case. Lutyens furniture and lighting has been recreating the designs of Sir Edwin Lutyens since 1987 but 2016 saw the great man’s granddaughter, designer Candia Lutyens, take on the mantel with her Lutyens Contemporary  range. Her aim is to bring a contemporary twist to the classic designs by using new materials and manufacturing techniques. The range includes chairs made from moulded ply, above, Perspex tables and bedside tables, lanterns and mirrors made from Valchromat, an engineered, self-coloured wood – which can additionally all be purchased pret-a-porter, online! Those with limited levels of lucre for Lutyens might be interested in their more affordable desk and table accessories, like condiment mills, clocks, lamps and candlesticks made from turned walnut and sycamore.

 

Latest

A set of sleek Lifeline Speedlane Swing turnstiles guides workers and visitors into the Stiff + Trevillion office refurbishment above London Cannon Street Station

Lifeline Speedlane Swing turnstiles guide workers into the Stiff + Trevillion office reburbishment

Pooja Agrawal takes up the role of chief executive of Public Practice in June. She talks about the successes and ambitions of the organisation she co-founded and its impact on local authorities and the profession

The new CEO on why local authority placements work

Edmund Harris’ intriguing cataloguing of Less Eminent Victorians is an engaging, enlightening and diverting investigation, finds Hugh Pearman

Edmund Harris’ engaging, enlightening and diverting investigative online blog

The time for fine words on inclusion is over: a group in Bath is taking decisive practical action to recognise all the world’s architecture, storm the discipline’s privilege and face down imperialism’s legacy

Political context must make way for real inclusivity

K-Briqs contain 90% certified construction waste and are made without the use of a kiln, to challenge traditional bricks with just over one tenth of their embodied carbon

Kenoteq start-up says K-Briq has potential to meet entire UK demand