Rake and ruin

Simpson and Brown’s new visitor centre for Rievaulx Abbey near York is characterised not just by a roof – so palpably missing from the Cistercian ruins beyond – but by the interesting twist of its glulam spruce structure as its cafeteria area reaches out to them. The timber piers gradually rake relative to one another in plan. The architect says it not only ‘reveals’ views of the abbey from the inside, but the timber columns reference the stone ones beyond. And perhaps referencing the abbey’s long gone lead roof, VMZinc was called in to provide this contemporary standing seam one, projecting out moodily from the trees.

 

Latest

Last month the pair launched the Developer Collective, a platform for design-led property development linking investors and architects. They’re also joint creative directors of the RIBA’s Guerrilla Tactics conference

Learn to think like a developer

To answer the question we need to understand what that crisis is, and what it isn’t

Why production rates aren’t the only issue

High performance carbon fibre stone could cut four gigatons of carbon a year from production while significantly outperforming steel and reinforced concrete

Four gigatons a year could be cut from production process

Architect who prized functionality with creativity, who worked tirelessly on ecclesiastical buildings and who devoted much of his retirement to South Downs Health Trust

Architect who prized functionality and creativity

Use of an experimental render means rainwater has been migrating into the house since it was built. Until a long-term solution can be found, Carmody Groarke's protective structure allows the building to dry out

Carmody Groarke's 'jewel box' for Scottish gem