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Concrete jungle

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek

No-one I’ve spoken to has ever failed to be moved by their first impressions of India; the mass of humanity, animal life and vegetation all occupying the same, densely urban space. As a form of homage to all of that, London-based design studio Tiipoi’s creative director Spandana Gopal has come up with its ‘Siment’ range of vases, based on the brutalist concrete water towers and flyover infrastructure of India’s infamous conurbations. Wanting to transform the ‘material of pure functionality into an opportunity for decoration’, Gopal sees the blurring of the two as something ’ever-present in Indian life.’

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