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Sound solution: Why acoustic design has never looked so good

Ecophon has made six updates to its Solo free-hanging acoustic panels range, offering architects some absorbing creative options for ceilings and walls

In association with
Ecophon Solo Baffle Zigzag: acoustic panels with sharp edges for a more distinctive look.
Ecophon Solo Baffle Zigzag: acoustic panels with sharp edges for a more distinctive look.

Ecophon has extended its Solo range of free-hanging acoustic panels to provide larger sizes, integrated lighting and new shapes.

The first acoustic ceiling cloud to launch into the market almost a decade ago, Ecophon Solo is a design-friendly sound absorber comprising an innovative glass wool core that is strong, durable and rigid, but lightweight and easy to install in virtually any space.

Alongside standard squares, rectangles and circles, the expanded Solo range now offers a 3000 x 1200mm rectangle - the largest on the market - as well as its on-trend narrow 2400 x 600mm rectangle. And with custom shapes and colours also available through Solo Freedom, Ecophon encourages designers to express themselves even more creatively.

In line with recent architectural trends for vertical acoustics, Solo Baffle Wave and Solo Baffle ZigZag have been designed with innovative shapes that complement traditional straight-edged designs. Solo Baffle on Wall acknowledges the growing importance of adding sound absorbers to walls and enables architects to make an interesting aesthetic statement while delivering improved sound.

  • Ecophon Solo Baffle Wave: acoustic panels that turn a ceiling into a rolling sea.
    Ecophon Solo Baffle Wave: acoustic panels that turn a ceiling into a rolling sea.
  • Ecophon Solo Rectangle: an acoustic panel available in a 3000 x 1200mm size - the largest on the market.
    Ecophon Solo Rectangle: an acoustic panel available in a 3000 x 1200mm size - the largest on the market.
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With lighting such an important design consideration, the range now provides a combined lighting and sound absorption option, the Ecophon Line luminaire. One of three normally only available in the Focus range, it has now been integrated into the 2400 x 1200mm Solo panel. Installation is as simple as hanging the panel, adding the included luminaire and connecting into the existing lighting system for a sleek combination of improved acoustics and light.

As Solo often needs to be installed close to the soffit - either as part of a design or due to a lack of ceiling height - the brand has developed a new, direct fixing solution that makes it simple to install the Solo panels just 50mm away from the surface.

The design of interior spaces has a huge effect on people’s experience so architects need the freedom to design solutions that not only deliver the required acoustic performance, but also complement and enhance it. Since launch, Ecophon Solo has become a favourite among architects. Saint-Gobain Ecophon develops, manufactures and markets acoustic systems that contribute to a good working environment by enhancing peoples' wellbeing and performance.

For more information and technical support, visit ecophon.com/uk/solo

 

Contact:

01256 850977

sales.office@ecophon.co.uk


 

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