Flotsam, Jetsam and Metsäm

Timber facing that flies in the face of seaside sodium

Since Le Corbusier said buildings should be more like liners, it’s no surprise that modernists saw the coastline as ripe territory – spawning the likes of the De La Warr pavilion, Midland Grand hotel and a whole host of kiss-me-quick white rendered holiday homes. Unfortunately, they discovered that concrete reinforcement really dislikes salty places, a problem that won’t trouble architect Walker & Martin’s design at Camber Sands in Sussex. The firm specified Metsä Wood for two homes designed to be entirely open plan and structure-free internally. With timber facing, that flies in the face of seaside sodium, off-site construction means the whole thing can be easily dismantled – even when the rot does finally claim the old sea dog.

 

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