img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek
Credit: Oxford University Museum of Natural History

If you wanted to see scales in Oxford you’ve always had to walk through its Museum of Natural History to reach the anthropological oddities of the Pitt Rivers Museum beyond. But you needn’t have gone so far. Above your head in the Museum of Natural History’s main hall, its Irish architects Deane and Woodward were, back in 1861, making their own scales – 8,500 diamond-shaped glass tiles for its roof. Now, as part of the building’s £2m refurbishment, which includes the leaking roof, architect Purcell has used the 500cm2 tiles as a template, putting 10mm Pilkington Optifloat clear glass slumped in a ceramic mould to reproduce them – NOT something you’ll want to do with the contents of any bell jar in the Pitt Rivers.

 

Latest

Nothing is too outfacing for our shortlisted schemes and two special mentions, which tackle poverty, environment, exclusion, health, housing, transport, community, workplace and more, often within one proposal

An enlivening shortlist and two brilliantly presented special mentions

Political backing for new build and repair will be vital but the payback invaluable – the sector must make its case to government

Political backing for construction is vital

Using timber in construction slows global warming through carbon capture and will help the UK fulfil its net zero commitment, argues the Wood CO2ts Less campaign

Using timber in construction helps reduce climate heating

The Abbey of St Peter in Montmajour at Arles was a tourist attraction long before Van Gogh featured it in his painting The Harvest

Abbey of St Peter in Montmajour, Arles, France; 11th-18th century

As the loosening lockdown sees non domestic buildings prepare to open up, managing inside services is critical to avoid a coronavirus resurgence

How to keep building services safe