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Not just about daylight...

Richard Dudzicki Architects specifies Glazing Vision rooflights to bring daylight and natural solar warmth into a new three-storey Passivhaus private home in leafy west London

A new house in west London designed by Richard Dudzicki Architects features Glazing Vision rooflights.
A new house in west London designed by Richard Dudzicki Architects features Glazing Vision rooflights.

Glazing Vision has installed a series of Flushglaze rooflights at a new three-storey private residence in a conservation area in west London. Designed to Passivhaus principles, the house has been completed by Richard Dudzicki Architects (RDA) to create an impressive contemporary home on a tree-lined street of Edwardian townhouses.

Glazing Vision’s Flushglaze rooflights have been critical to the design of the house, providing the essential amount of daylight required both to illuminate as well as heat the building.

Getting enough light into the rooms of the property was a major priority for both client and architect. The installation of Glazing Vision’s Flushglaze rooflights has contributed significantly to enhancing the light quality and quantity in the property. The largest of the rooflights, which is more than 4m in length, has been installed above the entrance, flooding the hallway and adjoining living area with daylight. Its minimal internal framework adds to the sense of loftiness and airiness, while complementing the modern glass balustrade of the staircase.

The Flushglaze rooflights, pointed directly at the light source, also provide excellent access to solar heat gains, while the triple glazed panes provide enhanced thermal performance. These were both invaluable benefits and critical to the property’s Passivhaus design.

A worthy winner of the Gold Award at the 2015 London Design Awards and a finalist in the urban category of the 2016 PassivHaus Awards, the home is a superb example of what can be achieved with PassivHaus certification, where contemporary design and low energy building construction are in synergy. 

  • Interior of a new Richard Dudzicki Architects-designed home in west London with large rooflights.
    Interior of a new Richard Dudzicki Architects-designed home in west London with large rooflights.
  • The entrance with rooflight above at new Richard Dudzicki house in west London.
    The entrance with rooflight above at new Richard Dudzicki house in west London.
  • A rooflight illuminates a bedroom in a new house designed by Richard Dudzicki Architects in west London.
    A rooflight illuminates a bedroom in a new house designed by Richard Dudzicki Architects in west London.
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For more information and technical support visit: www.glazingvision.co.uk

 

Contact:

01379 353 741 or request a CPD


 

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