Need help on ironmongery for a complex projects?

With a great track record on Fitzroy Place and Alder Hey Hospital, Laidlaw's Major Project Division is there to help deliver ironmongery on large schemes

In association with

Laidlaw Ironmongery’s Major Project Division is a team that architects and contractors trust to deliver a value-added service on large or complex building projects.

This specialist division has a proven track record on multiple landmark projects, such as the £180 million Fitzroy Place development in the City of Westminster, London, for which it delivered more than £400,000 worth of stainless steel and real bronze ironmongery.

Other projects include the supply of performance doors and ironmongery to Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool, as part of a £237 million transformation, while for the prestigious One St Peter’s Square development in Manchester, the team delivered integrated ironmongery, including lever handles made from grade 316 stainless steel.

The Major Project Division offers a full range of services, including:

  • Project consultation
  • Cost-planning options and life-cycle advice
  • Sample submittals/mock-up installations and technical data submissions
  • Detailed door-by-door scheduling / site surveys
  • Programme and project management.

It also works with many of the UK’s leading door suppliers, providing a full doorset, where required.

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For more information and technical support visit: www.laidlaw.co.uk

 

Contact:

01902 600406


 

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