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It’s all Greek…

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek

Greece might have been accused by the EU central bank of cutting corners when it came to sorting out the tax affairs of its population, but cutting corners  to great effect is what London based Greek architect Bureau de Change has been doing with its new furniture range for bespoke brand Efasma, which launched at 100% Design. The firm looked to local skills in joinery to produce its delicate oak and walnut frames, with weaving and basket-making skills used for the cotton rope-bound backs, giving the fine frames rigidity. Chairs engage with a white marble-topped, timber table via triangular, shiny brass-lined recesses cut into its edges, lending art-deco like geometry and detailing to the collection. If God’s in the detail here, let’s just call him Zeus.


 

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