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Jaime from Home

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek

Spanish designer Jaime Hayon, with his generally bonkers approach to product design, has secured his position in the last few years as one of the discipline’s enfant terribles. So it’s interesting to see his sashay into the contract world via furniture company Republic of Fritz Hansen. His high-backed sofa system Plenum consists of three, two, and (ah, there we have it!), one-person sofas with added features like power plugs and USB ports, with a mounted or separate table. Designed for the office, airport lounge or hotel lobby it seems that all these were the last thing on his mind. ‘The objective was to challenge the concept of traditional office furniture and create a feeling of home,’ Hayon explains. More restrained than his usual forays into product design, it’s a sober side to the character that the Financial Times called ‘The Clown Prince of Design’.

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