Key Lime Pied

Wenlock Edge in Shropshire has plenty of history. It’s here that Royalist cavalryman Major Thomas Smallman leapt off a 61m limestone escarpment to evade Cromwell’s Troops  and he and his horse are said to still haunt ‘Major’s Leap’. But it’s limestone formed in the Silurian Period 425 million years ago that’s let firm Lime Green develop the lime-based mortars, renders and plasters used on historic buildings around the UK, continuing a 500-year-old tradition of lime production in the area. It’s celebrated this fact by opening a new factory producing 100 tonnes daily.

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