Light tubes that last longer

Crystal, silver and quartz combine for Lightway's leading performance light tubes

In association with

As children we cast sunlit shapes onto walls with a mirror. As adults we can now bring sunlight directly into dim rooms anywhere in the house. The Lightway glass dome collects rays from the sun on the roof and sends them into the light tube even under overcast skies. Using crystal instead of plastic, the Lightway features a glass dome that is able to resist ageing even under intense exposure to UV rays, airborne dust, smog and other pollution. 

Inside the Lightway light tube, sunlight flows like water. The interior mirrors are exceptionally efficient due to the extreme reflectivity of their surface, composed of pure silver and quartz in lieu of mirrors more commonly made from polished aluminium or reflective foil glued inside the tubes. Unfortunately, these material variations produce less light and wear out sooner. In addition, Blue Performance Technology prevents heat loss from the building in winter, while in summer it conversely reduces excess heating, sparing condensed water leaking onto the floor below with every change in temperature. The light tube's thermal resistance value is measured to 0.4W/mK, and due to its high performance and quality materials Lightway is able to guarantee its light pipes for 25 years.

Can you think of a room where some additional sunlight would really brighten it up?

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For more information and technical support visit: www.lightwaydaylight.co.uk and www.sunpipes.co.uk

 

Contact:

0333 20 20 976

info@lightwaydaylight.co.uk


 

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