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Timber sash windows lead renovation of John Whichcord property

A Victorian townhouse in Dulwich designed in 1856 by the architect of The Grand Brighton hotel has been refurbished and features windows by Lomax + Wood

In association with
Lomax + Wood timber box sash windows at the Victorian townhouse in Dulwich designed by architect John Whichcord.
Lomax + Wood timber box sash windows at the Victorian townhouse in Dulwich designed by architect John Whichcord.

A Victorian property in Dulwich designed by John Whichcord, the English architect and designer of The Grand Brighton hotel, has been renovated.

Lomax + Wood supplied and fitted 19 high performance, double glazed, made-to-order timber box sash windows and the project included:

  • A Gold Package installation service.
  • Dual finish.
  • Engineered timber.
  • Ovolo mouldings.
  • Antique brass ironmongery.

The brief was to provide traditional period sightlines alongside a modern, high-performance specification that delivered thermal, acoustic and security standards. The timber windows and doors are glazed internally for security and all are tested independently to achieve PAS 24:2016, BS 6375 Part 1, 2 and 3.

The timber sash windows were supplied with a dual finish, white externally and black internally, with pre-stretched nylon cord and traditional box cords and weights. Each window is fully weather-stripped, double glazed and uses engineered knot-free timber for strength and stability.

Lomax + Wood fitted the project under its Gold Package installation service, which is suitable for private customers who want a complete solution. From the point of survey through to design, supply and installation, customers have only one point of contact: Lomax + Wood. They do not have to manage both a builder and a window provider.

The Lomax + Wood made-to-order timber box sash windows are designed and tested in the UK and covered by the Lomax + Wood FSC® Chain of Custody.

Lomax + Wood is committed to sourcing from sustainable sources and has worked hard to achieve FSC® Chain of Custody, an environmental gold standard. This work was undertaken in partnership with independent accredited certification body BM TRADA, a mark of quality in the industry.

FSC® Chain of Custody is not the same as a timber window and door supplier providing FSC® documents for the timber alone. The Lomax + Wood FSC® Chain of Custody ensures the product is FSC® from its source through to installation, if Lomax + Wood site fitting is specified, which is within the scope of its certification. Lomax + Wood Limited is certified according to the Forest Stewardship Council® standards. The FSC® licence code is FSC® C125169.

Lomax + Wood provides made-to-order timber windows and doors, including composite aluminium clad, with a supply-only or supply-and-fit option. They are available with specialist double, triple or single glazing to meet performance and Conservation Area requirements.

  • Lomax + Wood timber box sash windows.
    Lomax + Wood timber box sash windows.
  • Lomax + Wood timber door and box sash windows.
    Lomax + Wood timber door and box sash windows.
  • Lomax + Wood timber box sash windows.
    Lomax + Wood timber box sash windows.
  • Lomax + Wood timber box sash windows.
    Lomax + Wood timber box sash windows.
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For more information, case studies and technical support, visit lomaxwood.co.uk 

 

Contact:

01277 353857

sales@lomaxwood.co.uk


 

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