New roofing insulation goes from strength to strength

Following a successful pilot launch last year, Dow Building Solutions is receiving a highly positive response to its 2015 commercial roll-out of XENERGYTM - a flame retarded, XPS roof insulation product that is setting a new standard for the industry

In association with

XENERGYTM, which will replace Dow’s well-known STYROFOAMTM ROOFMATE SL-A, has been developed to achieve a significantly improved lambda insulation performance and delivers a Global Warming Potential (GWP) of less than five.

Since its official launch in January, XENERGYTM has gone from strength to strength and has just won a highly coveted Chemical Industries Association (CIA) award - the GSK Innovation Award.

XENERGYTM has also been specified for two prestigious new residential developments in London. A total of 8000sqm of XENERGYTM will be used at The Glebe in Chelsea - a prestigious new development, worth an estimated £300m.

In Hyde Park, a total of 3,500sqm of XENERGYTM will be used at Riverwalk – a new development comprising 113 one, two, three and four bedroom luxury apartments and penthouses.

Chris Gimson, commercial director at Dow Building Solutions, said:  “XENERGYTM is an innovative and sustainable product, which will keep homes warmer and ultimately benefit society by helping to reduce climate change.

“The UK is leading the way with the commercial roll-out of this product, which has received a warm response from architects, specifiers and contractors alike, and won a prestigious industry award - all in just six months.”

For more informaion visit building.dow.com

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