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Elegant range fits the bill in St James’s

Style Moderne bathroom fittings from Samuel Heath help The Crown Estate revitalise historic residence

In association with

Samuel Heath bathroom fittings and door and window furniture have been used on a prestigious refurbishment project to create exclusive residences for The Crown Estate at Cleveland Court, adjacent to St James’s Palace in the historic heart of London.

Joanna Wood International was appointed as interior designer and architect to revitalise the neoclassical building, designed by leading Edwardian architect, Frank Verity and constructed in 1905. The firm was tasked with creating an elegant and contemporary design worthy of the building’s location and history.

The Crown Estate requested that, wherever possible, finishes, furniture and fittings utilised the talent and resources available in England.

Throughout the project, bespoke, handmade joinery was commissioned in custom grey lacquer tones and veneers. Samuel Heath supplied custom-designed ironmongery in a variety of finishes to complement the doors, windows and joinery.

Bathrooms are both contemporary and luxurious with book-matched slab marbles, hand selected from the UK, Turkey and Italy.

Joanna Wood chose Samuel Heath’s Style Moderne range of bathroom fittings for vanities, baths and showers. Lead designer on the project, Merideth Paige, comments: ‘Style Moderne creates the most elegant lines, and is eminently suitable for contemporary and traditional interiors. It possesses an exceptionally high standard of finish, and the fact that the fittings were designed and manufactured in England by Samuel Heath, made it a natural choice for the project.’

Samuel Heath has a showroom at Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour. 

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For more information and technical support visit www.samuel-heath.co.uk

Contact

0121 766 4200

sales@samuel-heath.com


 

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