Cadisch MDA reveals the secret to specifying architectural metal

Choosing metals and finishes for design and architecture can be a complex business, but keeping just three things front of mind will reveal the material, fixing and finish you need - whatever your project

In association with
Cadisch MDA Welltec steel cladding in Corten finish, Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts, Peckham. Carl Turner Architects.
Cadisch MDA Welltec steel cladding in Corten finish, Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts, Peckham. Carl Turner Architects.

Over the past 50 years, metallurgy has advanced offering architects a broader range of metals and finishes. However there is no streamlined way to specify metal, mainly because no two metals - or projects - are the same and this has made specification complex.

Metal designer and supplier Cadisch MDA aims to simplify the process by offering a full consultative approach to working with clients. The company provides advice and guidance on the most suitable materials and finishes for projects, as well as support on fixing and installation.

Cadisch MDA has an extensive range of architectural metals, unique finishes and backing structures. Its ranges include expanded mesh, perforated mesh, corrugated profiles and woven mesh (which can be laminated in glass). It undertakes everything from small projects to large-scale cladding commissions across the world and many of its products have been specified on award-winning projects.

The team at Cadisch MDA recommends considering three key aspects when specifying architectural metal: the application, the aesthetic and the performance. These factors will influence the type of material, fixing and finish required for every project. 

Involving manufacturers like Cadisch MDA in the early consultation stages will benefit the development and realisation of the client and specifier’s vision for the building. For more top tips on specifying architectural metal, visit: cadischmda.com/blog

  • Perftec and Picperf architectural aluminium in anodised silver finish, Eadweard Muybridge artwork, Kingston. Haworth Tompkins architects.
    Perftec and Picperf architectural aluminium in anodised silver finish, Eadweard Muybridge artwork, Kingston. Haworth Tompkins architects.
  • Cadisch MDA Welltec perforated steel cladding with Corten Patina powder coat.
    Cadisch MDA Welltec perforated steel cladding with Corten Patina powder coat.
  • Meshtec Ambasciata architectural aluminium with Musical Waterfall finish.
    Meshtec Ambasciata architectural aluminium with Musical Waterfall finish.
  • Cadisch MDA Meshtec Ambasciata aluminium cladding with powder coated RAL 9010 at the Quarterhouse arts venue, Folkestone. Alison Brooks Architects.
    Cadisch MDA Meshtec Ambasciata aluminium cladding with powder coated RAL 9010 at the Quarterhouse arts venue, Folkestone. Alison Brooks Architects.
  • Meshtec Academy architectural aluminium with Treasure finish.
    Meshtec Academy architectural aluminium with Treasure finish.
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For more information and technical support, visit: cadischmda.com

 

Contact:

020 8492 7622

mda@cadisch.com


 

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