Steel enamel range now includes washbasins

Kaldewei’s broadening of its steel enamel offering is welcome news for designers

In association with

Kaldewei’s new steel enamel washbasins were a key focus at this year's Sleep event. Already a well established brand for baths and shower trays/surfaces, the manufacturer’s introduction of this new segment means bathrooms can now be fitted out using a single material, with a harmonious design vocabulary and a matching colour scheme.

Kaldewei washbasins are available in five design lines in diverse sizes and fitting options – from undercounter and built-in models to countertop and even a space-saving wall-hung version for the guest bathroom.

The Silenio washbasin by Anke Salomon has exceptionally soft interior lines. Flowing gently inwards from both sides, the lines open out into a soft hollow which contrasts with the rear section of the basin which falls steeply. The spacious surround offers plenty of room for fittings and accessories. A recent addition is a 120cm width countertop model. All Silenio washbasins are now also available without overflow hole, enhancing their natural, soft lines still further.

Offering distinct material advantages, Kaldewei steel enamel has stood the test for decades in bathroom design. Thanks to its extraordinary durability and great ease of cleaning, the material lends itself particularly to frequently and heavily used wash areas. With such a wide diversity of washbasins in the segment, Kaldewei provides lasting product solutions for any spatial situation – from the private bathroom to public washrooms.

12

For more information and technical support visit www.kaldewei.co.uk.

 

Contact

01480 498053


 

Latest

An RIBA survey reports an inevitable downturn in workload, plus home working, furloughing and a whole range of enabling technologies to learn

New ways of working try to keep heads above water during uncertainty

Wajiha Afsar took fourth place in our RIBAJ/Future Architects writing competition considering how, under a progressive government initiative in Wales, architects should look to the wellbeing of those who use their buildings

Wajiha Afsar’s essay on how to put Wales’ Wellbeing Act into action

T Alwyn Jones found a way round the risk from mining subsidence at Ystrad Mynach College of Further Education in south Wales

T Alwyn Jones’ Ystrad Mynach FE College, build in an area of mining subsidence

It’s only week 2 of the Covid-19 lockdown, and for many time is hanging heavy. We talk to five architects who are making the best of the extra time

Five architects reveal how they are making the best of being stuck at home

Karin Borghouts’ photograph reflects a scale beyond human measure at the Antwerp Royal Museum of Fine Arts

Restoration of the Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp