Caesarstone Quartz surfaces combine beauty, flexibility and durability

The beauty of natural materials with head-turning realism

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Thanks to advanced composition and manufacturing, Caesarstone quartz surfaces replicate the beauty of natural materials with head-turning realism. And the effect is not just aesthetic – for these surfaces also feel just like the real thing, too. 

The ‘Supernatural’ range, which launched with just 4 colours – Emperadoro, Frosty Carrina, Dreamy Marfil and London Grey – just over 2 years ago, now counts 6 colours and further new colours are scheduled for release on 9th July at an Open Day event.

Calacatta Nuvo, in particular, has proved exceptionally successful thanks to its faithful reproduction of Calacatta marble right down to the tiniest veins. Today’s quartz palette is all about timeless, tasteful neutrals that will look as good in 10 years’ time as on the day they were fitted.

And quartz offers designers, specifiers and retailers its flexibility and durability. David Beckett, Sales Director at Caesarstone explains, “Quartz is associated with kitchen work surfaces, but in reality, it’s an exceptionally versatile material that can be used to clad walls, furniture and even for flooring.”

Simplicity Granite specified Calacatta Nuvo for a ‘modern-classic’ kitchen. The company’s Lee says, “Quartz is very flexible so details are easy to achieve. Above all, our customers like the fact that it’s so hard-wearing. It doesn’t matter if the red wine gets spilled or if the kids are less than respectful. And the fact that maintenance is nothing more than a spritz and a wipe is also a bonus.”

For further information visit www.caesarstone.co.uk

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