The ties that bind

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek

Rope braced, timber lashed furniture

Credit: Thor Bjorn Fessel

Danish product designer Wahl&Ross is behind the bespoke furniture designed for the NOMA pop-up restaurant that appeared last month in Tokyo. Built in kebony wood, the items’ strength is apparently derived from ‘rope bracing and tightening techniques rediscovered from Nordic maritime explorers’. The ‘timber lashing technique’ meanwhile is inspired by ‘historic Japanese craft’. Would that be ancient ‘Shibari’ rope art, gentlemen? If so, your research has probably been as naughty as it was nautical.


 

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