Tiles of the unexpected

The capabilities of porcelain tiles are being investigated this summer in London’s trendy Primrose Hill, with Capitol Design Studio’s pop-up installation Pulsate. High-end tile firm Capitol Designer Studio commissioned artist Lily Jencks, daughter of architectural historian Charles, and Nathanael Dorent to reformulate its retail space, with the unbridled use of Marazzi SistemN tiles. Jencks and Dorent created a zany herringbone pattern from the 10cm by 60cm tiles, which play strange perspectival games with the space. They’re hoping it means the space is appropriated in new ways. ‘The floors are sloped, benches are built into the structure, so you’re never sure what you’re looking at. You can sit and talk, lie on the slope or view the product.’ Hopefully there’ll be more – a programme of events has been planned for the six months that the installation will remain in place.

Latest

An RIBA survey reports an inevitable downturn in workload, plus home working, furloughing and a whole range of enabling technologies to learn

New ways of working try to keep heads above water during uncertainty

Wajiha Afsar took fourth place in our RIBAJ/Future Architects writing competition considering how, under a progressive government initiative in Wales, architects should look to the wellbeing of those who use their buildings

Wajiha Afsar’s essay on how to put Wales’ Wellbeing Act into action

T Alwyn Jones found a way round the risk from mining subsidence at Ystrad Mynach College of Further Education in south Wales

T Alwyn Jones’ Ystrad Mynach FE College, build in an area of mining subsidence

It’s only week 2 of the Covid-19 lockdown, and for many time is hanging heavy. We talk to five architects who are making the best of the extra time

Five architects reveal how they are making the best of being stuck at home

Karin Borghouts’ photograph reflects a scale beyond human measure at the Antwerp Royal Museum of Fine Arts

Restoration of the Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp