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Tiles of the unexpected

The capabilities of porcelain tiles are being investigated this summer in London’s trendy Primrose Hill, with Capitol Design Studio’s pop-up installation Pulsate. High-end tile firm Capitol Designer Studio commissioned artist Lily Jencks, daughter of architectural historian Charles, and Nathanael Dorent to reformulate its retail space, with the unbridled use of Marazzi SistemN tiles. Jencks and Dorent created a zany herringbone pattern from the 10cm by 60cm tiles, which play strange perspectival games with the space. They’re hoping it means the space is appropriated in new ways. ‘The floors are sloped, benches are built into the structure, so you’re never sure what you’re looking at. You can sit and talk, lie on the slope or view the product.’ Hopefully there’ll be more – a programme of events has been planned for the six months that the installation will remain in place.

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