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Words:
Ruth Slavid

Winner: Existing Building Award

Sponsored by

The judges were highly impressed by the sensitivity shown in Coppin Dockray’s modern upgrade of some of the best of 1960s architecture – a small brick and timber house designed by David Levitt and a wood-lined stone studio by Alison and Peter Smithson.

In the house, many sequential changes made over 50 years were removed to express the rigorous architectonic qualities of the original light-weight Douglas fir construction. To open up the main space, the architect removed a late addition bathroom and internal walls and, with bespoke Douglas fir joinery, created a new bedroom and study. All the single-glazed windows were discreetly upgraded with new seals and double-glazed units. 


Location Wiltshire

Architect Coppin Dockray

Structural engineer Tall Engineering

Main contractor/builder J & C Symonds 

Joinery company Westside Design

Wood supplier Meyer Timber Ltd, SMS Veneering Services, Oscar Windebanks 

Wood Species Douglas fir, birch



Highly recommended

Conservation & repair of Harmondsworth Barn

Location Harmondsworth, Middlesex

Architect Ptolemy Dean Architects

Client/owner English Heritage

Structural engineer Historic England

Main contractor and joinery Owlsworth IJP

Wood suppliers Whippletree, Coyle Timber Products

Wood species English Oak

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