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Ayes on the prize

Credit: Keith Hunter

The 2016 Galvanisers Awards were presented last month, with the ‘Galvanising in Architecture’ prize going to worthy winner Sutherland Hussey Harris’ Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop. Starting as a grass roots movement to make studios for struggling artists, it received a Foundation Scotland Art Funding  prize in 2010 and gained further momentum with a £3 million private donation. The project’s latest manifestation is SuHuHa’s workshop cloister and campanile, paying homage to the work of Gillespie, Kidd and Coia. Pared-back and using nothing but concrete, brick and galvanised details, the exterior workspaces and community café are a hub for artists and locals; the joy of which is announced to the city by its austere yet compelling tower, illuminated at night, to counterpoint its curved Crown steeples.


 

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