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Back to the Future

Credit: Mads Flummer

Family-owned Danish furniture making company Fredericia has been around since 1911, making crafted, contemporary designs created with the help of internationally renowned designers. Its recent Spine collection, designed by Space Copenhagen, has two new additions. The Spine Lounge Petit is an elegant and comfortable lounge chair inspired by the functionalist ethos of famed 20th century Danish designer Børge Mogensen. Picking up on the same themes of restrained luxury is the Spine Daybed, which, with its piping detail, looks like a therapy couch for OCD minimalists. Complementing the soft, primal leather, timber frames are made more sophisticated in either lacquered oak or black lacquered. These future contenders for timeless design are all still handmade in Denmark – a fact reflected in its high-end price.

 

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