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Solar slate roof generates two thirds of hot water

Southover barn conversion in Wells, Somerset invisibly integrates Cupa Pizarras Thermoslate panels that convert sunlight into energy into a traditional pitched slate roof

In association with
Thermoslate at Southover: The Cupa Pizarras roof solar collector is the only solar system to use the properties of natural slate to convert sunlight to energy to produce hot water and home or pool heating.
Thermoslate at Southover: The Cupa Pizarras roof solar collector is the only solar system to use the properties of natural slate to convert sunlight to energy to produce hot water and home or pool heating.

Cupa Pizarras Thermoslate solar collector panels have been installed at a barn conversion in a conservation area near Wells Cathedral in Somerset.

The owners of the property were keen to use a natural material for the roof and wanted the building to make a sustainable contribution to their family’s energy needs. To meet the brief, architect Paul Kellett specified Thermoslate solar collectors and Cupa R12 Excellence slates. 

To generate 57 per cent of the energy required for hot water, six Thermoslate solar collectors were installed, reducing carbon emissions at the property by over 450kg a year. None of the panels are visible as the uniform colour and thickness across the 190m2 slated roof makes it is impossible to distinguish the solar collectors from the Cupa R12 slates.

The Thermoslate solar collector range by Cupa Pizarras enables architects to integrate solar collectors invisibly into any natural slate roof or cladding. For pitched roofs the collectors can be installed using a stainless steel fixing system either invisibly with nails or visibly with hooks. There is also a Thermoslate solar collector designed for natural slate flat roofs, floors and facades.

Thermoslate is a lightweight solution ideal for original, unstrengthened roofs and it can be installed in as little as three hours. Thermoslate is certified under the Solar Keymark scheme, conforms to BS EN 12975 and holds A+ BRE accreditation for environmental performance.

For more on this case study, visit cupapizarras.com/projects/southover-somerset

  • Its modular installation means that Thermoslate solar slate can be integrated faster and more easily in any type of surface covered with natural slate.
    Its modular installation means that Thermoslate solar slate can be integrated faster and more easily in any type of surface covered with natural slate.
  • Thermoslate solar panels are undetectable once installed and can be adapted to pitched or flat roofs, terraces and facades.
    Thermoslate solar panels are undetectable once installed and can be adapted to pitched or flat roofs, terraces and facades.
  • Slate is waterproof, durable, versatile and thermally inert. When reinvented as Thermoslate it contributes to a more natural use of solar thermal energy.
    Slate is waterproof, durable, versatile and thermally inert. When reinvented as Thermoslate it contributes to a more natural use of solar thermal energy.
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For more information and technical support, visit cupapizarras.com/thermoslate 

 

Contact:

0203 318 4455

uk@cupapizarras.com


 

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