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Fan on the Shannon

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek

The Irish town of Athlone’s new Luan Gallery extension is now open, taking advantage of its site the banks of the Shannon river. Overlooked by Athlone Castle, the gallery commission was won by London practice Keith Williams Architects in a competition staged by the town council in 2009, and was opened to the public last December.

If it was a squeeze on the opening night, it was nothing compared with the plant room space available for the air handling units servicing the gallery spaces. Manufacturer Fantech was brought in and after consulting with Dublin’s Axis Engineering, fitted the right sized Komfovent REGO heat recovery and Elta fan units. REGO customised units can deal with heat recuperation, cooling, humidifying, dehumidifying, filtration and sound attenuating performance with temperature efficiencies of up to 80%.

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