img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Forbo takes the lead with wayfinding floor arrows

Tessera and Marmoleum brands include options for adding symbols designed to manage social distancing and the safe movement of people around buildings

In association with
Walk this way: Forbo's Tessera Layout carpet tiles (left) and Marmoleum sheet flooring (right) can both be specified with directional arrows.
Walk this way: Forbo's Tessera Layout carpet tiles (left) and Marmoleum sheet flooring (right) can both be specified with directional arrows.

Forbo Flooring Systems now includes directional arrows as an added option on two of its ranges. The move aims to help signpost one-way systems around buildings and aid social distancing.

Updates to the Tessera Layout and Outline collection allow specifiers to create bespoke carpet tiles by choosing the colour of the background and a contrasting shade for the arrows. There are 40 colours to choose from, with a minimum order of 20 tiles (one box). 

Forbo's linoleum brand Marmoleum can also be ordered with loose arrows cut into the flooring. The arrows are available in all colours in its sheet range, with a minimum order of 50 arrows.

  • Tessera Outline carpet tiles with arrows: All 40 colours in the range can be used to produce directional tiles.
    Tessera Outline carpet tiles with arrows: All 40 colours in the range can be used to produce directional tiles.
  • Marmoleum sheet flooring with solid arrows: Forbo can also supply loose arrows to be cut into existing resilient installations.
    Marmoleum sheet flooring with solid arrows: Forbo can also supply loose arrows to be cut into existing resilient installations.
12

For more information and technical support, visit forbo-flooring.co.uk/covid

 

Contact:

01773 744121

info.flooring.uk@forbo.com


 

Latest

How is the construction industry, and architecture in particular, responding to the ever-changing impacts of Covid-19 and the upcoming Brexit deadline? Adrian Malleson, head of economic research at RIBA, provides an overview

How is architecture responding to Covid-19 and Brexit?

Monica Pidgeon’s 1961 photograph of Palazzo del Lavoro by Pier Luigi Nervi and Gio Ponti shows the remarkable exhibition space in its prime

Palazzo del Lavoro in Turin by Pier Luigi Nervi, 1961

On 20 October 2020 RIBAJ and PiP were joined by a group of experts and architects to discuss innovative infrastructure projects that are improving the lives of communities

Catch up with the latest in a series of RIBAJ and PiP online discussions

A cosy insulated coat now wraps around Piers Taylor’s 16 year old timber and glass home extension, muffling up inner warmth and reorganising the marvellous views

Home’s insulating over-layer improves comfort and reframes views

MHCLG’s Christopher Pincher calls on architects to join planning consultation as part of government’s strategy to build homes with ‘beauty, quality and environment’ at their core

Architects key to our better plans says housing minister Pincher