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Go beyond building regulations to futureproof your projects

An innovative architectural rooflight solution can help deliver the 2025 Future Homes Standard now

In association with
Multi-Part Flushglaze rooflight. All Glazing Vision rooflight products are designed and built in Diss, Norfolk.
Multi-Part Flushglaze rooflight. All Glazing Vision rooflight products are designed and built in Diss, Norfolk.

The 2025 Future Homes Standard will mean healthier, more sustainable homes. 

A consultation on the required technical changes to the Building Regulations was opened on 13 December 2023 and will run until 6 March 2024. The new regulations will come into effect next year.

But there are two key elements that make it possible to deliver a new residential development today and claim alignment with the Future Homes Standard:

  • Knowledge of the intended carbon reductions: a development can be assessed against the version of SAP used by the current Part L 2021, with improvements made to the specification so even greater carbon reductions are demonstrated.
  • Government introduced Part L 2021 as a stepping stone to the Future Homes Standard. It lays the groundwork for an increased uptake of heat pumps and the general electrification of properties, alongside much better building fabric standards. 

Use rooflights to deliver Future Homes Standard levels of performance

Glazing Vision has produced a white paper for architects called Using Rooflights To Design Tomorrow’s Homes Today With Improved Daylight And Ventilation.

Rooflights can provide a level and quality of daylight that facade glazing alone struggles to replicate. They can also save energy by reducing the reliance on artificial lighting.

Installed rooflights must deliver the right thermal transmittance (U-value), solar transmittance (g-value) and, where required, ventilation to support the overall energy efficiency and comfort goals. That is true whether choosing from an existing range or having bespoke items created to fit a particular architectural vision.

  • Glazing Vision  Flushglaze Eaves rooflight.
    Glazing Vision Flushglaze Eaves rooflight.
  • Glazing Vision Bespoke Sliding Over Fixed rooflight.
    Glazing Vision Bespoke Sliding Over Fixed rooflight.
  • Glazing Vision SkyDoor rooflight.
    Glazing Vision SkyDoor rooflight.
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Rooflights must be capable of being installed within the surrounding roof without creating a break in the thermal envelope that causes significant thermal bridging. Thermal bridging heat losses risk undoing all the intended performance goals for the dwelling as a whole.

Rooflights can be positioned to limit solar gain and reduce overhearting. They also have the potential to provide natural ventilation on projects where cross-ventilation through a property is not possible, for example on high-rise developments.

Demonstrating sustainability is now an important element of every residential development. Balancing the requirements of energy efficiency, comfort and health, while delivering on quality and luxury means working with manufacturers who understand all those goals and can work with architects to offer the right solutions.

What Glazing Vision can do for architects:

  • Bespoke rooflight solutions that bring aesthetics, light and space to projects.
  • Help look towards the Future Homes Standard by exceeding the requirements of Part L 2021 to futureproof individual projects.
  • Provide expert technical support for meeting daylight, ventilation and access requirements.
  • Supply the details required for correct specification, including U-values and CAD drawings.

For more information and technical support, visit glazingvision.co.uk 

Contact:
01379 658300
glazingvision.co.uk/contact/


 

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