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Hose springs inferral

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek

Lavier's Sackler Gallery fountain

Credit: Bertrand Lavier

Enfant terrible of French art Bertrand Lavier is making  his mischievous presence felt outside Zaha Hadid’s Serpentine Sackler gallery until October 2015, with the gallery’s latest installation – a large-scale fountain made of garden hoses. The artist has been much influenced by Marcel Duchamp’s ‘Readymades’, but opposes the notion of ‘indifference’ inherent in those works. Lavier presents more culturally attuned pieces: an anvil on a chest of drawers, a Dali lips sofa atop a freezer, and his wonderful 1993 car smash ‘Dino’ – a write-off Ferrari Dino GT4, which sold last year for over US$250,000. The fountain was first installed on the parterre of Le Nôtre’s Versailles, a context much more loaded perhaps than beside Zaha’s parametric awning, but hey-hose...

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