img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Huliotropic rooflight

Hull based Ciralight is wringing a bit more from the UK’s overcast skies now it is sole supplier of the US developed ‘Active Skylight’, which tracks the sun’s  movement to optimise internal lighting levels for large spaces, reducing the need for electric lighting. The skylight is housed in a rooftop plastic dome and uses a GPS controller and a microprocessor to calculate and track the position of the sun. It reflects sunlight via a mirror array down into the space via a highly reflective integral light well. Called the ‘Suntracker’ in the US, the firm sadly felt that low UK expectations of the weather meant that name could be successfully marketed here. Instead, it hopes the energy-saving potential of its revolving rooflight will turn heads and turn off lights.

Latest

As the BSA imposes profound changes on the construction process, Pilbrow & Partners is putting a rigorous checklist and proof of principal designer competence at the heart of its quality control

Pilbrow & Partners is putting collaboration, competence and checking at the heart of quality control

Strong design references underpin a lively journey through changing fashions, styles and careers to reflect the full Barbie-verse

Strong design references underpin a journey through the Barbie-verse

Climate model of Greater London finds white or reflective roofs are significantly more effective at reducing temperatures than both vegetation-covered roofs and deciduous tree cover

White or reflective roofs are much better to reduce temperatures finds climate model

The Featherstone Young director took off for Slovakia for her annual cycling trip with friends, and found a country fascinating for the contrasts thrown up by its emergence from communism

The Featherstone Young director is fascinated by the contrasts of post-communist Slovakia

Of the 26 schemes sifted from the RIBA Regional Awards, it is not only this year's abundance of mega-projects that reached the next round en route to the Stirling Prize

Smaller schemes join big beasts such as the Elizabeth Line and Battersea Power Station